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effects_of_religious_practice_on_family_relationships [2017/10/03 07:55]
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effects_of_religious_practice_on_family_relationships [2017/10/03 07:55] (current)
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 [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-46-48-164.pdf|{{ :​quality_of_parent_child_relationship_religion_and_fs.jpg?​500 |Quality of Parent-Child Relationship}}]] [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-46-48-164.pdf|{{ :​quality_of_parent_child_relationship_religion_and_fs.jpg?​500 |Quality of Parent-Child Relationship}}]]
  
-=====4. Domestic Violence=====+=====5. Domestic Violence=====
  
 Couples who share the same religious commitment are less likely to commit [[effects_of_religious_practice_on_society|acts of domestic violence]].((Christopher G. Ellison, John P. Bartkowski, and Kristin L. Anderson, “Are There Religious Variations in Domestic Violence?​” //Journal of Family Issues// 20, no. 1 (January 1999): 87-113.)) Men who attend religious services at least weekly are less than half as likely to commit an act of violence against their partners as their peers who attend once yearly or less.((Christopher G. Ellison, John P. Bartkowski, and Kristin L. Anderson, “Are There Religious Variations in Domestic Violence?​” //Journal of Family Issues// 20, no. 1 (January 1999): 87-113.)) Regular attendance at religious services has a strong and statistically significant inverse association with the incidence of domestic abuse.((Christopher G. Ellison and Kristin L. Anderson, “Religious Involvement and Domestic Violence Among U.S. Couples,” //Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion// 40, no. 2 (June 2001): 269-286.)) Mothers who attended religious services less often over time reported a lower quality relationship with their adult child.((Lisa D. Pearce and William G. Axinn, “The Impact of Family Religious Life on the Quality of Mother-Child Relations,​” //American Sociological Review// 63, no. 6 (December 1998): 810-828.)) Compared to those who consider themselves “very religious,​” those who are “not at all religious” are far more likely to bear a [[effects_of_out-of-wedlock_births_on_society|child out of wedlock]] (among whites, three times as likely; among Hispanics, 2.5 times as likely; and among blacks, twice as likely).((Allan F. Abrahamse, //Beyond Stereotypes:​ Who Becomes a Single Teenage Mother?// (Santa Monica, CA: Rand Corporation,​ 1988), 37-50. Couples who share the same religious commitment are less likely to commit [[effects_of_religious_practice_on_society|acts of domestic violence]].((Christopher G. Ellison, John P. Bartkowski, and Kristin L. Anderson, “Are There Religious Variations in Domestic Violence?​” //Journal of Family Issues// 20, no. 1 (January 1999): 87-113.)) Men who attend religious services at least weekly are less than half as likely to commit an act of violence against their partners as their peers who attend once yearly or less.((Christopher G. Ellison, John P. Bartkowski, and Kristin L. Anderson, “Are There Religious Variations in Domestic Violence?​” //Journal of Family Issues// 20, no. 1 (January 1999): 87-113.)) Regular attendance at religious services has a strong and statistically significant inverse association with the incidence of domestic abuse.((Christopher G. Ellison and Kristin L. Anderson, “Religious Involvement and Domestic Violence Among U.S. Couples,” //Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion// 40, no. 2 (June 2001): 269-286.)) Mothers who attended religious services less often over time reported a lower quality relationship with their adult child.((Lisa D. Pearce and William G. Axinn, “The Impact of Family Religious Life on the Quality of Mother-Child Relations,​” //American Sociological Review// 63, no. 6 (December 1998): 810-828.)) Compared to those who consider themselves “very religious,​” those who are “not at all religious” are far more likely to bear a [[effects_of_out-of-wedlock_births_on_society|child out of wedlock]] (among whites, three times as likely; among Hispanics, 2.5 times as likely; and among blacks, twice as likely).((Allan F. Abrahamse, //Beyond Stereotypes:​ Who Becomes a Single Teenage Mother?// (Santa Monica, CA: Rand Corporation,​ 1988), 37-50.