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effects_of_religious_practice_on_family_relationships [2016/06/20 09:45]
marri [2.Father-Child Relations]
effects_of_religious_practice_on_family_relationships [2017/10/03 07:55] (current)
marri
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 Wilcox also traced the “pathways” through which religion affects fathers’ relationships with their children and concluded that religious affiliation and especially religious attendance have unique effects that are independent of conventional habits of civic engagement. The emphasis that religion typically places on family life, along with churches’ family-focused social networks of support and psychological support of fatherhood, helps to explain why religiously active fathers are more involved in youth-related activities.((W. Bradford Wilcox, “Religion,​ Convention, and Paternal Involvement,​” //Journal of Marriage and Family// 64, no. 3 (August 2002): 780–792.)) ​ Wilcox also traced the “pathways” through which religion affects fathers’ relationships with their children and concluded that religious affiliation and especially religious attendance have unique effects that are independent of conventional habits of civic engagement. The emphasis that religion typically places on family life, along with churches’ family-focused social networks of support and psychological support of fatherhood, helps to explain why religiously active fathers are more involved in youth-related activities.((W. Bradford Wilcox, “Religion,​ Convention, and Paternal Involvement,​” //Journal of Marriage and Family// 64, no. 3 (August 2002): 780–792.)) ​
  
-=====3. ​Related American Demographics=====+=====3. ​Family Ties===== 
 +According to a 2016 Pew Research Center Report, highly religious Americans((Highly religious Americans is defined as those who pray everyday and attend religious services at least once a week.)) are most likely to attend gatherings with their extended family at least once a month, and, correspondingly,​ are most likely to report being “very satisfied” with their family life.((Pew Research Center, "​Religion in Everyday Life" (April 2016), available at [[http://​assets.pewresearch.org/​wp-content/​uploads/​sites/​11/​2016/​04/​Religion-in-Everyday-Life-FINAL.pdf]].)) “Unaffiliated” Americans are less likely than those of Christians or non-Christian faiths to be “very satisfied” with their family life.((Pew Research Center, "​Religion in Everyday Life" (April 2016), available at [[http://​assets.pewresearch.org/​wp-content/​uploads/​sites/​11/​2016/​04/​Religion-in-Everyday-Life-FINAL.pdf]].)) The National Survey of Families and Households shows that adults who attended frequent religious services as children reported more frequent contact with and higher quality relationships with their mother and father.((King,​ Valarie, Maggie Ledwell, and Jennifer Pearce-Morris,​ "​Religion and Ties Between Adult Children and Their Parents,"​ //Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences// 68, no. 5 (2013): 825-836.)) ​
  
-According to the General Social Survey (1972-2006),​ adults who attend religious services at least weekly are more likely to believe in the importance of having their own children than those who worship less frequently.((This chart draws on data collected by the General Social Survey, 1972-2006. From 1972 to 1993, the sample size averaged 1,500 each year. No GSS was conducted in 1979, 1981, or 1992. Since 1994, the GSS has been conducted only in even-numbered years and uses two samples per GSS that total approximately 3,000. In 2006, a third sample was added for a total sample size of 4,510. \\ Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, "The Personal Importance of Having Children by Religious Attendance,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​downloads.frc.org/​EF/​EF09K51.pdf]])) (See [[http://​downloads.frc.org/​EF/​EF09K51.pdf|Chart]] ) +=====4. Related American Demographics=====
  
-[[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF09K51.pdf|{{ :personal_of_having_children_by_religious_attendance.png?​500 ​|The Personal Importance of Having Children by Religious Attendance}}]]+According to the General Social Survey (1972-2006),​ adults who attend religious services at least weekly are more likely to believe in the importance of having their own children than those who worship less frequently.((This chart draws on data collected by the General Social Survey, 1972-2006. From 1972 to 1993, the sample size averaged 1,500 each year. No GSS was conducted in 1979, 1981, or 1992. Since 1994, the GSS has been conducted only in even-numbered years and uses two samples per GSS that total approximately 3,000. In 2006, a third sample was added for a total sample size of 4,510. \\ Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, "The Personal Importance of Having Children by Religious Attendance,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://marri.us/wp-content/uploads/​MA-79-81-175.pdf]])) (See [[http://marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-79-81-175.pdf|Chart]] 
  
-The National Survey of Children'​s Health shows that children who attend worship at least weekly have a higher-quality relationship with their parents than those who worship less frequently.((This chart draws on data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics in the National Survey of Children'​s Health (NSCH) in 2003. The data sample consisted of parents of 102,353 children and teens in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. 68,996 of these children and teens were between six and 17 years old, the age group that was the focus of the study. The survey sample in this age range represented a population of nearly 49 million young people nationwide. \\ Nicholas Zill, "​Quality of Parent-Child Relationship and Religious Attendance,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​get.cfm?​i=MA09B04]])) (See [[http://marri.us/get.cfm?i=MA09B04|Chart]] Below) ​+[[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-79-81-175.pdf|{{ :​personal_of_having_children_by_religious_attendance.jpg?500 |The Personal Importance of Having Children by Religious Attendance}}]]
  
-[[http://​marri.us/​get.cfm?​i=MA09B04|{{ ​:quality_of_parent_child_relationship_and_religious_attendance.png?500 |Quality of Parent-Child Relationships}}]]+The National Survey of Children'​s Health shows that children who attend worship at least weekly have a higher-quality relationship with their parents than those who worship less frequently.((This chart draws on data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics in the National Survey of Children'​s Health (NSCH) in 2003. The data sample consisted of parents of 102,353 children and teens in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. 68,996 of these children and teens were between six and 17 years old, the age group that was the focus of the study. The survey sample in this age range represented a population of nearly 49 million young people nationwide. \\ Nicholas Zill, "​Quality of Parent-Child Relationship and Religious Attendance,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-46-48-164.pdf]])) (See [[http://marri.us/wp-content/​uploads/​MA-46-48-164.pdf|Chart]] Below) ​
  
-Both family structure and religious attendance effect the quality of parent-child relationships. The National Survey of Children'​s Health showed that children from intact families who frequently attended worship were most likely to have a high-quality relationship with their parents. ((This chart draws on data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics in the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) in 2003. The data sample consisted of parents of 102,353 children and teens in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. 68,996 of these children and teens were between six and 17 years old, the age group that was the focus of the study. The survey sample in this age range represented a population of nearly 49 million young people nationwide. \\ Nicholas Zill, "​Quality of Parent-Child Relationship,​ Religious Attendance, and Family Structure,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF09D42.pdf]])) (See [[http://downloads.frc.org/​EF/​EF09D42.pdf|Chart]] Below) ​+[[http://marri.us/wp-content/uploads/​MA-46-48-164.pdf|{{ :quality_of_parent_child_relationship_and_religious_attendance.jpg?​500 ​|Quality of Parent-Child Relationships}}]]
  
-[[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF09D42.pdf|{{ :quality_of_parent_child_relationship_religion_and_fs.png?400 |Quality of Parent-Child Relationship}}]]+Both family structure and religious attendance effect the quality of parent-child relationships. The National Survey of Children'​s Health showed that children from intact families who frequently attended worship were most likely to have a high-quality relationship with their parents. ((This chart draws on data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics in the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) in 2003. The data sample consisted of parents of 102,353 children and teens in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. 68,996 of these children and teens were between six and 17 years old, the age group that was the focus of the study. The survey sample in this age range represented a population of nearly 49 million young people nationwide. \\ Nicholas Zill, "​Quality of Parent-Child Relationship,​ Religious Attendance, and Family Structure,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://marri.us/wp-content/uploads/​MA-46-48-164.pdf]])) (See [[http://marri.us/wp-content/​uploads/​MA-46-48-164.pdf|Chart]] Below) ​
  
-=====4. Domestic Violence=====+[[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-46-48-164.pdf|{{ :​quality_of_parent_child_relationship_religion_and_fs.jpg?​500 |Quality of Parent-Child Relationship}}]] 
 + 
 +=====5. Domestic Violence=====
  
 Couples who share the same religious commitment are less likely to commit [[effects_of_religious_practice_on_society|acts of domestic violence]].((Christopher G. Ellison, John P. Bartkowski, and Kristin L. Anderson, “Are There Religious Variations in Domestic Violence?​” //Journal of Family Issues// 20, no. 1 (January 1999): 87-113.)) Men who attend religious services at least weekly are less than half as likely to commit an act of violence against their partners as their peers who attend once yearly or less.((Christopher G. Ellison, John P. Bartkowski, and Kristin L. Anderson, “Are There Religious Variations in Domestic Violence?​” //Journal of Family Issues// 20, no. 1 (January 1999): 87-113.)) Regular attendance at religious services has a strong and statistically significant inverse association with the incidence of domestic abuse.((Christopher G. Ellison and Kristin L. Anderson, “Religious Involvement and Domestic Violence Among U.S. Couples,” //Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion// 40, no. 2 (June 2001): 269-286.)) Mothers who attended religious services less often over time reported a lower quality relationship with their adult child.((Lisa D. Pearce and William G. Axinn, “The Impact of Family Religious Life on the Quality of Mother-Child Relations,​” //American Sociological Review// 63, no. 6 (December 1998): 810-828.)) Compared to those who consider themselves “very religious,​” those who are “not at all religious” are far more likely to bear a [[effects_of_out-of-wedlock_births_on_society|child out of wedlock]] (among whites, three times as likely; among Hispanics, 2.5 times as likely; and among blacks, twice as likely).((Allan F. Abrahamse, //Beyond Stereotypes:​ Who Becomes a Single Teenage Mother?// (Santa Monica, CA: Rand Corporation,​ 1988), 37-50. Couples who share the same religious commitment are less likely to commit [[effects_of_religious_practice_on_society|acts of domestic violence]].((Christopher G. Ellison, John P. Bartkowski, and Kristin L. Anderson, “Are There Religious Variations in Domestic Violence?​” //Journal of Family Issues// 20, no. 1 (January 1999): 87-113.)) Men who attend religious services at least weekly are less than half as likely to commit an act of violence against their partners as their peers who attend once yearly or less.((Christopher G. Ellison, John P. Bartkowski, and Kristin L. Anderson, “Are There Religious Variations in Domestic Violence?​” //Journal of Family Issues// 20, no. 1 (January 1999): 87-113.)) Regular attendance at religious services has a strong and statistically significant inverse association with the incidence of domestic abuse.((Christopher G. Ellison and Kristin L. Anderson, “Religious Involvement and Domestic Violence Among U.S. Couples,” //Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion// 40, no. 2 (June 2001): 269-286.)) Mothers who attended religious services less often over time reported a lower quality relationship with their adult child.((Lisa D. Pearce and William G. Axinn, “The Impact of Family Religious Life on the Quality of Mother-Child Relations,​” //American Sociological Review// 63, no. 6 (December 1998): 810-828.)) Compared to those who consider themselves “very religious,​” those who are “not at all religious” are far more likely to bear a [[effects_of_out-of-wedlock_births_on_society|child out of wedlock]] (among whites, three times as likely; among Hispanics, 2.5 times as likely; and among blacks, twice as likely).((Allan F. Abrahamse, //Beyond Stereotypes:​ Who Becomes a Single Teenage Mother?// (Santa Monica, CA: Rand Corporation,​ 1988), 37-50.
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-This entry draws heavily from [[http://​marri.us/​reasons-for-religion|95 Social Science Reasons for Religious Worship and Practice]] and+This entry draws heavily from [[http://​marri.us/​research/​research-papers/​95-social-science-reasons-for-religious-worship-and-practice/​|95 Social Science Reasons for Religious Worship and Practice]] and
 [[http://​www.heritage.org/​research/​reports/​2006/​12/​why-religion-matters-even-more-the-impact-of-religious-practice-on-social-stability|Why Religion Matters Even More: The Impact of Religious Practice on Social Stability]].)) ​ [[http://​www.heritage.org/​research/​reports/​2006/​12/​why-religion-matters-even-more-the-impact-of-religious-practice-on-social-stability|Why Religion Matters Even More: The Impact of Religious Practice on Social Stability]].)) ​