Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Next revision
Previous revision
effects.of.divorce.on.children.s.behavior [2017/05/16 08:45]
marri [1.1 Related American Demographics]
effects.of.divorce.on.children.s.behavior [2017/05/16 09:58] (current)
marri [5.1 Related American Demographics]
Line 19: Line 19:
 According to the National Survey of Children'​s Health, children who live with both biological parents are less likely to exhibit behavior problems than those who do not.((This chart draws on data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics in the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) in 2003. The data sample consisted of parents of 102,353 children and teens in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. 68,996 of these children and teens were between six and 17 years old, the age group that was the focus of the study. The survey sample in this age range represented a population of nearly 49 million young people nationwide. \\ Patrick F. Fagan, "​Behavior Problems and Family Structure,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-28-30-158.pdf]])) (See [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-28-30-158.pdf|Chart]]) According to the National Survey of Children'​s Health, children who live with both biological parents are less likely to exhibit behavior problems than those who do not.((This chart draws on data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics in the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) in 2003. The data sample consisted of parents of 102,353 children and teens in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. 68,996 of these children and teens were between six and 17 years old, the age group that was the focus of the study. The survey sample in this age range represented a population of nearly 49 million young people nationwide. \\ Patrick F. Fagan, "​Behavior Problems and Family Structure,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-28-30-158.pdf]])) (See [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-28-30-158.pdf|Chart]])
  
-[[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-28-30-158.pdf|{{ :​child_behavior_problems_by_family_structure.jpg?​400 |Behavior Problems by Family Structure}}]]+[[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-28-30-158.pdf|{{ :​child_behavior_problems_by_family_structure.jpg?​500 |Behavior Problems by Family Structure}}]]
  
 Similarly, the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health shows that adolescents from intact married families are less frequently suspended, expelled, or delinquent, and less frequently experience [[effects_of_divorce_on_children_s_education|school problems]] than children from other family structures.((This chart draws on a large national sample (16,000) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. This work was done by the author in cooperation with former colleagues at The Heritage Foundation, Washington, D.C \\ Patrick F. Fagan, “Family Structure and Expulsion or Suspension from School.” Available at  Similarly, the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health shows that adolescents from intact married families are less frequently suspended, expelled, or delinquent, and less frequently experience [[effects_of_divorce_on_children_s_education|school problems]] than children from other family structures.((This chart draws on a large national sample (16,000) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. This work was done by the author in cooperation with former colleagues at The Heritage Foundation, Washington, D.C \\ Patrick F. Fagan, “Family Structure and Expulsion or Suspension from School.” Available at 
-[[http://www.frc.org/mappingamerica/mapping-america-20-family-structure-and-expulsion-or-suspension-from-school]]. Accessed 22 September 2011.+[[http://marri.us/wp-content/uploads/MA-19-21-155.pdf]]. Accessed 22 September 2011.
 \\ Paul R. Amato, “The Impact of Family Formation Change on the Cognitive, Social, and Emotional Wellbeing of the Next Generation,​” //Future of Children// 15, (2005): 86. \\ Paul R. Amato, “The Impact of Family Formation Change on the Cognitive, Social, and Emotional Wellbeing of the Next Generation,​” //Future of Children// 15, (2005): 86.
 \\ Wendy D. Manning and Kathleen A. Lamb, “Adolescent Well-Being in Cohabitating,​ Married, and Single-Parent Families,​” //Journal of Marriage and the Family// 65, no. 4 (2003): 885-893. \\ Wendy D. Manning and Kathleen A. Lamb, “Adolescent Well-Being in Cohabitating,​ Married, and Single-Parent Families,​” //Journal of Marriage and the Family// 65, no. 4 (2003): 885-893.
-\\ Annette U. Rickel and Thomas S. Langer, “Short-Term and Long-Term Effects of Marital Disruption on Children,​” //American Journal of Community Psychology//​ 13, (1985): 599–661.)) (See [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08I10.pdf|Chart]])+\\ Annette U. Rickel and Thomas S. Langer, “Short-Term and Long-Term Effects of Marital Disruption on Children,​” //American Journal of Community Psychology//​ 13, (1985): 599–661.)) (See [[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-19-21-155.pdf|Chart]])
  
-[[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08I10.pdf|{{ :family_structure_and_expulsion_or_suspension_from_school.png?400 |Expelled or Suspended from School by Family Structure}}]]+[[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-19-21-155.pdf|{{ :adolescents_suspended_or_expelled_by_family_structure.jpg?500 |Expelled or Suspended from School by Family Structure}}]]
  
 =====2. Ability to Handle Conflict===== =====2. Ability to Handle Conflict=====
Line 39: Line 39:
 ====2.1 Related American Demographics==== ====2.1 Related American Demographics====
  
-According to the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Waves I and II), 42.6 percent of adolescents living with one biological, cohabiting parent have been in a fight, whereas only 28.8 percent of those with two married parents have ever been in one. Among other family structures, 32.3 percent of adolescents living in stepfamilies,​ 36.7 percent of those living with two cohabiting biological parents, 39.5 percent of those whose parents are divorced, and 39.6 percent of those whose parents have never married have ever been in a fight. ((This chart draws on a large national sample (16,000) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. This work was done by the author in cooperation with former colleagues at The Heritage Foundation, Washington, D.C \\ Patrick F. Fagan, "​Family Structure and Fighting,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08H09.pdf]])) (See [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08H09.pdf|Chart]] )+According to the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Waves I and II), 42.6 percent of adolescents living with one biological, cohabiting parent have been in a fight, whereas only 28.8 percent of those with two married parents have ever been in one. Among other family structures, 32.3 percent of adolescents living in stepfamilies,​ 36.7 percent of those living with two cohabiting biological parents, 39.5 percent of those whose parents are divorced, and 39.6 percent of those whose parents have never married have ever been in a fight. ((This chart draws on a large national sample (16,000) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. This work was done by the author in cooperation with former colleagues at The Heritage Foundation, Washington, D.C \\ Patrick F. Fagan, "​Family Structure and Fighting,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://marri.us/wp-content/uploads/​MA-13-15-153.pdf]])) (See [[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-13-15-153.pdf|Chart]] )
  
-[[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08H09.pdf|{{ :family_structure_and_fighting.png?400 |Ever Got Into a Fight by Family Structure}}]]+[[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-13-15-153.pdf|{{ :ever_got_into_a_fight_by_family_structure.jpg?500 |Ever Got Into a Fight by Family Structure}}]]
  
 =====3. Sexual Practice===== =====3. Sexual Practice=====
Line 63: Line 63:
 ====4.1 Related American Demographics==== ====4.1 Related American Demographics====
  
-According to the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, 13 percent of children who live in an intact married family admit to having stolen at least $50 worth of goods. By comparison, 19 percent of children whose parents never married or are divorced, 20 percent of children living with a stepparent, 15 percent of those living with cohabiting biological parents, and 23 percent of those living with one cohabiting biological parent have stolen at least $50 worth of goods.((This chart draws on a large national sample (16,000) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. This work was done by the author in cooperation with former colleagues at The Heritage Foundation, Washington, D.C. \\ Patrick F. Fagan, "​Family Structure and Theft,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08J04.pdf00]])) (See [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08J04.pdf|Chart]] Below) ​+According to the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, 13 percent of children who live in an intact married family admit to having stolen at least $50 worth of goods. By comparison, 19 percent of children whose parents never married or are divorced, 20 percent of children living with a stepparent, 15 percent of those living with cohabiting biological parents, and 23 percent of those living with one cohabiting biological parent have stolen at least $50 worth of goods.((This chart draws on a large national sample (16,000) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. This work was done by the author in cooperation with former colleagues at The Heritage Foundation, Washington, D.C. \\ Patrick F. Fagan, "​Family Structure and Theft,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://marri.us/wp-content/uploads/​MA-22-24-156.pdf]])) (See [[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-22-24-156.pdf|Chart]] Below) ​
  
-[[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08J04.pdf|{{ :family_structure_and_theft.png?400 |Theft by Family Structure}}]]+[[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-22-24-156.pdf|{{ :theft_by_family_structure.jpg?500 |Theft by Family Structure}}]]
  
 =====5. Drugs and Alcohol===== =====5. Drugs and Alcohol=====
Line 75: Line 75:
 ====5.1 Related American Demographics==== ====5.1 Related American Demographics====
  
-According to the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Waves I and II), children who live with both biological parents are less likely to get drunk than adolescents with stepparents,​ one biological cohabiting parent, or divorced parents.((This chart draws on a large national sample (16,000) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. This work was done by the author in cooperation with former colleagues at The Heritage Foundation, Washington, D.C. \\ Patrick F. Fagan, "​Family Structure and Drinking,"​ Mapping America Projects. Available at [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08H82.pdf]])) (See [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08H82.pdf|Chart]] Below) ​+According to the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Waves I and II), children who live with both biological parents are less likely to get drunk than adolescents with stepparents,​ one biological cohabiting parent, or divorced parents.((This chart draws on a large national sample (16,000) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. This work was done by the author in cooperation with former colleagues at The Heritage Foundation, Washington, D.C. \\ Patrick F. Fagan, "​Family Structure and Drinking,"​ Mapping America Projects. Available at [[http://marri.us/wp-content/uploads/​MA-16-18-154.pdf]])) (See [[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-16-18-154.pdf|Chart]] Below) ​
  
-[[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08H82.pdf|{{ :family_structure_and_drinking.png?400 |Getting Drunk by Family Structure}}]]+[[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-16-18-154.pdf|{{ :adolescents_who_got_drunk_by_family_structure.jpg?500 |Getting Drunk by Family Structure}}]]
  
-According to the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, more than 15 percent of adolescents whose parents are divorced have used hard drugs; this figure rises to roughly 18 percent for children living with a stepparent or one biological cohabiting parent.((This chart draws on a large national sample (16,000) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. This work was done by the author in cooperation with former colleagues at The Heritage Foundation, Washington, D.C. \\ Patrick F. Fagan, "​Family Structure and Adolescent Use of Hard Drugs,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08F26.pdf]])) (See [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08F26.pdf| Chart]])+According to the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, more than 15 percent of adolescents whose parents are divorced have used hard drugs; this figure rises to roughly 18 percent for children living with a stepparent or one biological cohabiting parent.((This chart draws on a large national sample (16,000) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. This work was done by the author in cooperation with former colleagues at The Heritage Foundation, Washington, D.C. \\ Patrick F. Fagan, "​Family Structure and Adolescent Use of Hard Drugs,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://marri.us/wp-content/uploads/​MA-7-9-151.pdf]])) (See [[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-7-9-151.pdf| Chart]])
  
-[[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08F26.pdf|{{ :family_structure_and_adolescent_use_of_hard_drugs.png?400 |Hard Drug Use by Family Structure}}]]+[[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-7-9-151.pdf|{{ :adolescent_hard_drug_use_by_family_structure.jpg?500 |Hard Drug Use by Family Structure}}]]
  
 =====6. Suicide===== =====6. Suicide=====