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pornography_objectifies_women [2015/11/16 07:48]
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pornography_objectifies_women [2017/06/08 07:51] (current)
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 =====3. Acceptance of Rape===== =====3. Acceptance of Rape=====
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-Pornographic films also degrade women through “[[pornography_and_sexual_offense|rape myth acceptance]]” scenes, which depict women being raped and ultimately enjoying the experience. These scenes foster the belief that women really “want” to be raped. Jeannette Norris of the University of Washington conducted a study in which a group of students read two versions of the same story depicting a woman being raped. The story, however, had two different endings: one version ended with the woman deeply distressed, the other ended with the woman seeming to enjoy herself. Even though the two stories were identical in every way except for the woman’s reaction at the end, the students viewed the scenario more positively when the story depicted the woman as enjoying the rape. They perceived the raped woman as having a greater “desire” to have sex and were thus more accepting of what the man had done.((Jeanette Norris, “Social Influence Effects on Responses to Sexually Explicit Material Containing Violence,​” //The Journal of Sex Research// 28, (1991): 67-76, 70-73.)) 
  
 After prolonged exposure to pornography,​ [[effects_of_pornography_on_men_versus_women|men especially, but also some women]], trivialize rape as a lesser offense.((James B. Weaver III, “The Effects of Pornography Addiction on Families and Communities” (Testimony presented before the Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation,​ Washington, D.C., November 18, 2004), 3.)) After prolonged exposure to pornography,​ [[effects_of_pornography_on_men_versus_women|men especially, but also some women]], trivialize rape as a lesser offense.((James B. Weaver III, “The Effects of Pornography Addiction on Families and Communities” (Testimony presented before the Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation,​ Washington, D.C., November 18, 2004), 3.))
  
 Similar results emerge in assessments of college men. Sarah Murnen of Kenyon College, Ohio found that fraternity members, who displayed many more pornographic pictures of women in their rooms than those from the non-fraternity group, had more [[pornography_and_sexual_offense|positive attitudes toward rape]].((Timothy E. Bleecker and Sarah K. Murnen, “Fraternity Membership, the Display of Degrading Sexual Images of Women, and Rape Myth Acceptance,​” //Sex Roles// 53, (2005): 487-493, 490.)) ​ Similar results emerge in assessments of college men. Sarah Murnen of Kenyon College, Ohio found that fraternity members, who displayed many more pornographic pictures of women in their rooms than those from the non-fraternity group, had more [[pornography_and_sexual_offense|positive attitudes toward rape]].((Timothy E. Bleecker and Sarah K. Murnen, “Fraternity Membership, the Display of Degrading Sexual Images of Women, and Rape Myth Acceptance,​” //Sex Roles// 53, (2005): 487-493, 490.)) ​
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 +Pornographic films also degrade women through “[[pornography_and_sexual_offense|rape myth acceptance]]” scenes, which depict women being raped and ultimately enjoying the experience. These scenes foster the belief that women really “want” to be raped. Jeannette Norris of the University of Washington conducted a study in which a group of students read two versions of the same story depicting a woman being raped. The story, however, had two different endings: one version ended with the woman deeply distressed, the other ended with the woman seeming to enjoy herself. Even though the two stories were identical in every way except for the woman’s reaction at the end, the students viewed the scenario more positively when the story depicted the woman as enjoying the rape. They perceived the raped woman as having a greater “desire” to have sex and were thus more accepting of what the man had done.((Jeanette Norris, “Social Influence Effects on Responses to Sexually Explicit Material Containing Violence,​” //The Journal of Sex Research// 28, (1991): 67-76, 70-73.))
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 =====4. Women’s View of Pornography===== ​ =====4. Women’s View of Pornography===== ​
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-This entry draws heavily from [[http://microsite.frc.org/get.cfm?​i=RS09K01|The Effects of Pornography on Individuals,​ Marriage, Family and Community]].)) ​+This entry draws heavily from [[http://marri.us/​research/​research-papers/​the-effects-of-pornography-on-individuals-marriage-family-and-community/|The Effects of Pornography on Individuals,​ Marriage, Family and Community]].)) ​