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government_s_approach_to_adoption [2015/10/25 08:18]
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government_s_approach_to_adoption [2015/11/13 13:54] (current)
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 Adoption is one of those rare good solutions to many thorny problems. Political leaders should help the country realize that it is one of the most effective ways to alleviate the problems arising from [[effects_of_out-of-wedlock_births_on_society|illegitimacy]],​ [[child_abuse_in_the_united_states|child abuse, and neglect]]. Adoption is one of those rare good solutions to many thorny problems. Political leaders should help the country realize that it is one of the most effective ways to alleviate the problems arising from [[effects_of_out-of-wedlock_births_on_society|illegitimacy]],​ [[child_abuse_in_the_united_states|child abuse, and neglect]].
  
-Lawmakers also must challenge the leaders of other major institutions,​ especially church leaders, to talk about the [[adoption_outcomes|goodness of adoption]]. Educational leaders, particularly in social studies areas, ought to be challenged to develop good materials on adoption. Health insurance leaders ought to be challenged as well, for adoption is a less costly solution to infertility than is most fertility treatment. Media leaders ought to harness their expertise in communications to promote adoption to the nation at large, instead of attacking it.((Marvin Olasky, "The War on Adoption,"​ //National Review//June 7, 1993, pp. 38-44.)) ​+Lawmakers also must challenge the leaders of other major institutions,​ especially church leaders, to talk about the [[adoption_outcomes|goodness of adoption]]. Educational leaders, particularly in social studies areas, ought to be challenged to develop good materials on adoption. Health insurance leaders ought to be challenged as well, for adoption is a less costly solution to infertility than is most fertility treatment. Media leaders ought to harness their expertise in communications to promote adoption to the nation at large, instead of attacking it.((Marvin Olasky, "The War on Adoption,"​ //National Review// ​(June 7, 1993): 38-44.)) ​
  
 The more this is done, the more attractive adoption will be to growing numbers of families. America also needs to celebrate [[parents_wanting_to_adopt|parents who adopt]] and parents who care for foster children -- especially those who both foster and adopt. ​ The more this is done, the more attractive adoption will be to growing numbers of families. America also needs to celebrate [[parents_wanting_to_adopt|parents who adopt]] and parents who care for foster children -- especially those who both foster and adopt. ​
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 To increase the pool of available parents to fill the [[the_need_for_adoption|needs of all children]], states should encourage the privatization of adoption. Specialized agencies can work constructively with those sections of the community that are willing to serve the many different needs of children: black children, older children, children with [[parents_wanting_to_adopt|special medical problems]], and children with other emotional or developmental difficulties. As different groups already have demonstrated,​ it is possible to line up a pool of screened and qualified parents more than willing to adopt children with even the most difficult needs. To increase the pool of available parents to fill the [[the_need_for_adoption|needs of all children]], states should encourage the privatization of adoption. Specialized agencies can work constructively with those sections of the community that are willing to serve the many different needs of children: black children, older children, children with [[parents_wanting_to_adopt|special medical problems]], and children with other emotional or developmental difficulties. As different groups already have demonstrated,​ it is possible to line up a pool of screened and qualified parents more than willing to adopt children with even the most difficult needs.
  
-One effort, started by Fr. George Clements in Chicago in the mid-1980s had each church set about achieving the adoption of one child within the congregation.((Christine Adamec and William L. Pierce, //The Encyclopedia of Adoption// (New York: Facts on File, 1991), ​p. 68.)) Though initially the program received wide publicity and had some impact, it has not become a sustained and organized national effort. However, in Florida, One Church, One Child of Florida has developed a successful partnership between church and state. Between March 1988 and September 1990, this organization placed 805 [[barriers_to_black_children_in_adoption|black children in adoption]].((Christine Adamec and William L. Pierce, //The Encyclopedia of Adoption// (New York: Facts on File, 1991), ​pp. 68-69.)) ​+One effort, started by Fr. George Clements in Chicago in the mid-1980s had each church set about achieving the adoption of one child within the congregation.((Christine Adamec and William L. Pierce, //The Encyclopedia of Adoption// (New York: Facts on File, 1991), 68.)) Though initially the program received wide publicity and had some impact, it has not become a sustained and organized national effort. However, in Florida, One Church, One Child of Florida has developed a successful partnership between church and state. Between March 1988 and September 1990, this organization placed 805 [[barriers_to_black_children_in_adoption|black children in adoption]].((Christine Adamec and William L. Pierce, //The Encyclopedia of Adoption// (New York: Facts on File, 1991), 68-69.)) ​
  
 Phoebe Dawson, a social worker who heads New Beginnings (a licensed nonprofit adoption agency in Columbus, Georgia) has been very successful in this work. For instance, an agency in Cleveland, Ohio, was not able to find minority parents for a young minority child, leaving the child at serious risk of a protracted wait for adoption. One worker at the agency contacted New Beginnings, which was able to resolve the problem quickly because of its close ties to black Baptist churches across the country. Phoebe Dawson, a social worker who heads New Beginnings (a licensed nonprofit adoption agency in Columbus, Georgia) has been very successful in this work. For instance, an agency in Cleveland, Ohio, was not able to find minority parents for a young minority child, leaving the child at serious risk of a protracted wait for adoption. One worker at the agency contacted New Beginnings, which was able to resolve the problem quickly because of its close ties to black Baptist churches across the country.
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 **8) Enact a strict 12-month timeline for adjudication of the long-term parental status of every child in foster care.** **8) Enact a strict 12-month timeline for adjudication of the long-term parental status of every child in foster care.**
  
-A University of Chicago study finds that children who enter foster care as infants remain in the system 22 percent longer than other young children.((Conna Craig, "What I Need Is a Mom" //Policy Review// 73 (1995):40.+A University of Chicago study finds that children who enter foster care as infants remain in the system 22 percent longer than other young children.((Conna Craig, "What I Need Is a Mom" //Policy Review// 73(1995): 40.
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