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effects_of_family_structure_on_children_s_education [2017/05/23 08:34]
marri [4.1 Related American Demographics]
effects_of_family_structure_on_children_s_education [2017/05/23 08:42]
marri [5.1 Related American Demographics]
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 ====5.1 Related American Demographics==== ====5.1 Related American Demographics====
  
-The National Survey of Children’s Health showed that only 21 percent of children who worship frequently and live with both biological parents or with two adoptive parents are the object of their school reporting behavior problems to parents, compared to a much larger 53 percent of children who worship less than monthly and live in single-parent or reconstituted families.((This chart draws on data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics in the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) in 2003. The data sample consisted of parents of 102,353 children and teens in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. 68,996 of these children and teens were between six and 17 years old, the age group that was the focus of the study. The survey sample in this age range represented a population of nearly 49 million young people nationwide. \\ Nicholas Zill, "​Parents Contacted by School about Their Children’s Behavior Problems, Religious Attendance, and Family Structure,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF09F25.pdf]])) (See [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF09F25.pdf|Chart]])+The National Survey of Children’s Health showed that only 21 percent of children who worship frequently and live with both biological parents or with two adoptive parents are the object of their school reporting behavior problems to parents, compared to a much larger 53 percent of children who worship less than monthly and live in single-parent or reconstituted families.((This chart draws on data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics in the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) in 2003. The data sample consisted of parents of 102,353 children and teens in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. 68,996 of these children and teens were between six and 17 years old, the age group that was the focus of the study. The survey sample in this age range represented a population of nearly 49 million young people nationwide. \\ Nicholas Zill, "​Parents Contacted by School about Their Children’s Behavior Problems, Religious Attendance, and Family Structure,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://marri.us/wp-content/uploads/​MA-52-54-166.pdf]])) (See [[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-52-54-166.pdf|Chart]])
  
-[[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF09F25.pdf|{{ :parents_contacted_about_child_s_behavior_religious_and_fs.png?500 |Percent of Children Whose Parents Were Contacted by School about Children'​s Behavior Problems}}]]+[[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-52-54-166.pdf|{{ :parents_contact_by_school_by_family_structure_and_religious_practice.jpg?500 |Percent of Children Whose Parents Were Contacted by School about Children'​s Behavior Problems}}]]
  
-According to  National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, teenagers in intact married families who attend religious services weekly or more than monthly have a higher combined English and math GPA (2.9) than those in non-intact families who attend religious services monthly or never (2.5).((This chart draws on a large national sample (16,000) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. This work was done by the author in cooperation with former colleagues at The Heritage Foundation. \\ National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. As cited by Patrick F. Fagan, “Religious Attendance, Family Structure, and School Performance of U.S. High School Students.” Available at [[http://www.frc.org/mappingamerica/mapping-america-3-religious-attendance-family-structure-and-schoolperformance-of-us-high-school-students]]. Accessed 12 September 2011.)) (See [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08J10.pdf|Chart]] Below) ​+According to  National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, teenagers in intact married families who attend religious services weekly or more than monthly have a higher combined English and math GPA (2.9) than those in non-intact families who attend religious services monthly or never (2.5).((This chart draws on a large national sample (16,000) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. This work was done by the author in cooperation with former colleagues at The Heritage Foundation. \\ National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. As cited by Patrick F. Fagan, “Religious Attendance, Family Structure, and School Performance of U.S. High School Students.” Available at [[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-1-3-149.pdf]]. Accessed 12 September 2011.)) (See [[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-1-3-149.pdf|Chart]] Below) ​
  
-[[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08J10.pdf|{{ :hs_performance_religion_and_fs.png?500 |GPA English/ Math by Religious Attendance and Family Structure}}]]+[[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-1-3-149.pdf|{{ :average_gpa_in_english_and_math_by_family_structure_and_religious_practice.jpg?500 |GPA English/ Math by Religious Attendance and Family Structure}}]]
  
-The National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health also showed that teenagers who attend religious activities weekly or more had the highest average combined GPA for English and Math (2.9).((Patrick Fagan, Kirk A. Johnson and Jonathan Butcher, "A Portrait of Family and Religion in America,"​ The Heritage Foundation, (2006). Chart 20, based on data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. \\ Patrick F. Fagan, "​Religious Attendance and School Performance of U.S. High School Students,"​ Mapping America Project available at [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08C36.pdf]])) (See [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08C36.pdf|Chart]] Below)+The National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health also showed that teenagers who attend religious activities weekly or more had the highest average combined GPA for English and Math (2.9).((Patrick Fagan, Kirk A. Johnson and Jonathan Butcher, "A Portrait of Family and Religion in America,"​ The Heritage Foundation, (2006). Chart 20, based on data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. \\ Patrick F. Fagan, "​Religious Attendance and School Performance of U.S. High School Students,"​ Mapping America Project available at [[http://marri.us/wp-content/uploads/​MA-1-3-149.pdf]])) (See [[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-1-3-149.pdf|Chart]] Below)
  
-[[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF08C36.pdf|{{ :hs_performance_by_religion_2.png?500 |Combined Average in English and Math}}]]+[[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-1-3-149.pdf|{{ :average_gpa_in_english_and_math_by_religious_practice.jpg?500 |Combined Average in English and Math}}]]
  
 =====6. Family Socioeconomic Status===== =====6. Family Socioeconomic Status=====