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effects.of.marriage.on.mental.health [2015/11/11 08:47]
marri2
effects.of.marriage.on.mental.health [2017/05/22 10:11]
marri [6.1 Related American Demographics]
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 ====1.1 Related American Demographics==== ====1.1 Related American Demographics====
  
-According to the National Survey of Children’s Health, biological parents and adoptive parents who are married report less parenting stress (48.9) than single mothers (52.1), biological parent/​stepparent families (52.0), or “other” family structure (50.6) such as single fathers. ((This chart draws on data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics in the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) in 2003. The data sample consisted of parents of 102,353 children and teens in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. 68,996 of these children and teens were between six and 17 years old, the age group that was the focus of the study. The survey sample in this age range represented a population of nearly 49 million young people nationwide. \\ Nicholas Zill, "​Parenting Stress and Family Structure,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF09A28.pdf]])) (See [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF09A28.pdf|Chart]] Below)+According to the National Survey of Children’s Health, biological parents and adoptive parents who are married report less parenting stress (48.9) than single mothers (52.1), biological parent/​stepparent families (52.0), or “other” family structure (50.6) such as single fathers. ((This chart draws on data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics in the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) in 2003. The data sample consisted of parents of 102,353 children and teens in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. 68,996 of these children and teens were between six and 17 years old, the age group that was the focus of the study. The survey sample in this age range represented a population of nearly 49 million young people nationwide. \\ Nicholas Zill, "​Parenting Stress and Family Structure,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://marri.us/wp-content/uploads/​MA-34-36-160.pdf]])) (See [[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-34-36-160.pdf|Chart]] Below)
  
-[[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF09A28.pdf|{{ :​parenting_stress_and_family_structure.png?500 |Parenting Stress by Family Structure}}]]+[[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-34-36-160.pdf|{{ :​parenting_stress_and_family_structure.jpg?500 |Parenting Stress by Family Structure}}]]
  
 =====2. Depression===== =====2. Depression=====
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 ====4.1 Related American Demographics==== ====4.1 Related American Demographics====
  
-A larger fraction of those raised in an intact family consider themselves “very happy” than those raised in non-intact families.((This chart draws on data collected by the General Social Survey, 1972-2006. From 1972 to 1993, the sample size averaged 1,500 each year. No GSS was conducted in 1979, 1981, or 1992. Since 1994, the GSS has been conducted only in even-numbered years and uses two samples per GSS that total approximately 3,000. In 2006, a third sample was added for a total sample size of 4,510. \\ Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “Intergenerational Links to Happiness: Family Structure.” Available at [[http://www.frc.org/mappingamerica/mapping-america-50-intergenerational-links-to-happiness-family-structure]]. Accessed 26 August 2011.)) (See [[http://​marri.us/​get.cfm?​i=MA09B08|Chart]] Below)+A larger fraction of those raised in an intact family consider themselves “very happy” than those raised in non-intact families.((This chart draws on data collected by the General Social Survey, 1972-2006. From 1972 to 1993, the sample size averaged 1,500 each year. No GSS was conducted in 1979, 1981, or 1992. Since 1994, the GSS has been conducted only in even-numbered years and uses two samples per GSS that total approximately 3,000. In 2006, a third sample was added for a total sample size of 4,510. \\ Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “Intergenerational Links to Happiness: Family Structure.” Available at [[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-49-51-165.pdf]]. Accessed 26 August 2011.)) (See [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-49-51-165.pdf|Chart]] Below)
  
-[[http://​marri.us/​get.cfm?​i=MA09B08|{{ :intergenerational_links_to_happiness_family_structure.png?500 |Percent Who Are Very Happy}}]]+[[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-49-51-165.pdf|{{ :very_happy_by_family_structure.jpg?500 |Percent Who Are Very Happy}}]]
  
 =====5. Drug and Alcohol Use===== =====5. Drug and Alcohol Use=====
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 ====6.1 Related American Demographics==== ====6.1 Related American Demographics====
  
-According to the General Social Survey (GSS), always-intact married adults are less likely than married, previously divorced adults or unmarried adults to believe that most people would try to take advantage of others.((This chart draws on data collected by the General Social Survey, 1972-2006. From 1972 to 1993, the sample size averaged 1,500 each year. No GSS was conducted in 1979, 1981, or 1992. Since 1994, the GSS has been conducted only in even-numbered years and uses two samples per GSS that total approximately 3,000. In 2006, a third sample was added for a total sample size of 4,510. \\ Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “’Belief That People Try to Take Advantage of Others’ by Marital Status.” Available at [[http://www.frc.org/mappingamerica/mapping-america-89-belief-that-people-try-to-take-advantage-of-others-by-marital-status]]. Accessed 26 August 2011.+According to the General Social Survey (GSS), always-intact married adults are less likely than married, previously divorced adults or unmarried adults to believe that most people would try to take advantage of others.((This chart draws on data collected by the General Social Survey, 1972-2006. From 1972 to 1993, the sample size averaged 1,500 each year. No GSS was conducted in 1979, 1981, or 1992. Since 1994, the GSS has been conducted only in even-numbered years and uses two samples per GSS that total approximately 3,000. In 2006, a third sample was added for a total sample size of 4,510. \\ Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “’Belief That People Try to Take Advantage of Others’ by Marital Status.” Available at [[http://marri.us/wp-content/uploads/MA-88-90-178.pdf]]. Accessed 26 August 2011.
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 This entry draws heavily from [[http://​marri.us/​reasons-to-marry|164 Reasons to Marry]].)) (See [[http://​downloads.frc.org/​EF/​EF10B43.pdf|Chart]] Below) This entry draws heavily from [[http://​marri.us/​reasons-to-marry|164 Reasons to Marry]].)) (See [[http://​downloads.frc.org/​EF/​EF10B43.pdf|Chart]] Below)
  
-[[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF10B43.pdf|{{ :​belief_that_people_try_to_take_advantage_of_others_by_marital_status.png?500 |"​Belief That People Try to Take Advantage of Others"​ by Marital Status}}]]+[[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-88-90-178.pdf|{{ :​belief_that_people_try_to_take_advantage_of_others_by_marital_status.jpg?500 |"​Belief That People Try to Take Advantage of Others"​ by Marital Status}}]]