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effects.of.marriage.on.couples.relationships [2017/05/22 07:50]
marri [1. Happiness]
effects.of.marriage.on.couples.relationships [2017/05/22 08:00] (current)
marri [2.1 Related American Demographics]
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 Those who marry experience increased commitment and stability.((Daniel Lees, “The Psychological Benefits of Marriage,​” //Research Note// (2007): 1-4. Available at [[http://​www.maxim.org.nz/​file/​pdf/​psychological_benefits_of_marriage.pdf]]. Accessed 27 July 2011.)) Men raised in married families have more open, affectionate,​ and cooperative relationships with the women to whom they are attracted to than do those from divorced families.((Silvio Silvestri, “Marital Instability in Men From Intact and Divorced Families: Interpersonal Behavior, Cognitions and Intimacy,​” //Journal of Divorce and Remarriage//​ 18, (1992): 79-108. Those who marry experience increased commitment and stability.((Daniel Lees, “The Psychological Benefits of Marriage,​” //Research Note// (2007): 1-4. Available at [[http://​www.maxim.org.nz/​file/​pdf/​psychological_benefits_of_marriage.pdf]]. Accessed 27 July 2011.)) Men raised in married families have more open, affectionate,​ and cooperative relationships with the women to whom they are attracted to than do those from divorced families.((Silvio Silvestri, “Marital Instability in Men From Intact and Divorced Families: Interpersonal Behavior, Cognitions and Intimacy,​” //Journal of Divorce and Remarriage//​ 18, (1992): 79-108.
- \\ G.K. Rhoades, et al. "​Parents'​ Marital Status, Conflict, and Role Modeling: Links with Adult Romantic Relationship Quality,"​ //Journal of Divorce & Remarriage//​ 53, no. 5 (2012): 358.)) Correspondingly,​ married mothers report more love and intimacy in their romantic/​spousal relationships than [[cohabitation.and.future.marital.stability|cohabiting]] or single mothers.((S.R. Aronson and A.C. Huston, “The Mother-Infant Relationship in Single, Cohabiting, and Married Families: A Case for Marriage?​” //Journal of Family Psychology//​ 18, no. 1 (2004): 5-18. As cited by The Heritage Foundation: Family Facts. Available at [[http://​www.familyfacts.org/​search?​q=huston%20and%20aronson&​type=findings&​page=1]]. Accessed 1 September 2011.)) Those [[effect_of_divorce_on_children_s_future_relationships|raised in married families]] have higher expectations of eventually marrying,​((Wendy D. Manning, “The Changing Institution of Marriage: Adolescents’ Expectation to Cohabit and to Marry,” //Journal of Marriage and Family// 69, no. 3 (2007): 559-575. As cited by The Heritage Foundation: Family Facts. Available at [[http://​www.familyfacts.org/​briefs/​22/​navigating-the-winding-road-how-family-and-religion-influence-teen-and-young-adult-outcomes]]. Accessed 20 July 2011)) and a larger fraction of those from intact families than non-intact families are happy in their marriages.((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “Intergenerational Links to Marital Happiness: Family Structure.” Available at [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-31-33-159.pdf]]. Accessed 1 September 2011)) Similarly, a lower percentage of those raised in intact families divorce.((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “Divorce or Separation: Family Structure in Adolescence.” Available at [[http://www.frc.org/mappingamerica/mapping-america-62-divorce-or-separation-family-structure-in-adolescence]]. Accessed 22 September 2011.+ \\ G.K. Rhoades, et al. "​Parents'​ Marital Status, Conflict, and Role Modeling: Links with Adult Romantic Relationship Quality,"​ //Journal of Divorce & Remarriage//​ 53, no. 5 (2012): 358.)) Correspondingly,​ married mothers report more love and intimacy in their romantic/​spousal relationships than [[cohabitation.and.future.marital.stability|cohabiting]] or single mothers.((S.R. Aronson and A.C. Huston, “The Mother-Infant Relationship in Single, Cohabiting, and Married Families: A Case for Marriage?​” //Journal of Family Psychology//​ 18, no. 1 (2004): 5-18. As cited by The Heritage Foundation: Family Facts. Available at [[http://​www.familyfacts.org/​search?​q=huston%20and%20aronson&​type=findings&​page=1]]. Accessed 1 September 2011.)) Those [[effect_of_divorce_on_children_s_future_relationships|raised in married families]] have higher expectations of eventually marrying,​((Wendy D. Manning, “The Changing Institution of Marriage: Adolescents’ Expectation to Cohabit and to Marry,” //Journal of Marriage and Family// 69, no. 3 (2007): 559-575. As cited by The Heritage Foundation: Family Facts. Available at [[http://​www.familyfacts.org/​briefs/​22/​navigating-the-winding-road-how-family-and-religion-influence-teen-and-young-adult-outcomes]]. Accessed 20 July 2011)) and a larger fraction of those from intact families than non-intact families are happy in their marriages.((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “Intergenerational Links to Marital Happiness: Family Structure.” Available at [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-31-33-159.pdf]]. Accessed 1 September 2011)) Similarly, a lower percentage of those raised in intact families divorce.((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “Divorce or Separation: Family Structure in Adolescence.” Available at [[http://marri.us/wp-content/uploads/MA-61-63-169.pdf]]. Accessed 22 September 2011.
 \\ Jay D. Teachman, “Childhood Living Arrangements and the Intergenerational Transmission of Divorce,” //Journal of Marriage and Family// 64, (2002): 717–729. As cited by The Heritage Foundation: Family Facts. Available at [[http://​www.familyfacts.org/​briefs/​39/​family-environment-and-childrens-prospects-for-marriage]]. Accessed 20 July 2011.)) ​ \\ Jay D. Teachman, “Childhood Living Arrangements and the Intergenerational Transmission of Divorce,” //Journal of Marriage and Family// 64, (2002): 717–729. As cited by The Heritage Foundation: Family Facts. Available at [[http://​www.familyfacts.org/​briefs/​39/​family-environment-and-childrens-prospects-for-marriage]]. Accessed 20 July 2011.)) ​
  
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 [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-116.pdf|{{ :​feels_thrilled_excited_during_intercourse_by_marital_status.jpg?​500 |Percentage Who Feel Thrilled, Excited During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner}}]] [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-116.pdf|{{ :​feels_thrilled_excited_during_intercourse_by_marital_status.jpg?​500 |Percentage Who Feel Thrilled, Excited During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner}}]]
  
-A larger fraction of individuals in intact marriages than always-single,​ divorced or separated, or divorced and remarried persons report “very, extremely” enjoying intercourse with their current sexual partner.((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “Degree to Which Respondent Enjoys Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner by Current Religious Attendance and Marital Status.” Available at [[http://​marri.us/​get.cfm?​i=MA13D03]]. Accessed 19 December 2013.)) Likewise, a larger fraction of individuals in intact marriages than always-single,​ divorced or separated, or divorced and remarried persons report feeling satisfied,​((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “‘Feels Satisfied During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner’ by Current Religious Attendance and Marital Status,” Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​get.cfm?​i=MA13E07]]. Accessed 19 December 2013.)) (See [[http://​downloads.frc.org/​EF/​EF13I38.pdf| Chart]] Below) loved,​((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “‘Feels Loved During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner’ by Current Religious Attendance and Marital Status,” Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​get.cfm?​i=MA13E05]]. Accessed 19 December 2013.)) “taken care of,​”((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “‘Feels “Taken Care of” During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner’ by Current Religious Attendance and Marital Status,” Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​get.cfm?​i=MA12H06]]. Accessed 19 December 2013.)) and thrilled or excited((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “‘Feels Thrilled, Excited During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner’ by Current Religious Attendance and Marital Status,” Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​get.cfm?​i=MA12H03]]. Accessed 19 December 2013.)) during intercourse with their current sexual partner. Those in always-intact marriages were most likely to report feeling wanted and needed during intercourse (92 percent).((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, "​“Feels Wanted, Needed During Intercourse” with Current Sexual Partner by Marital Status and Religious Attendance,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-127.pdf]])) These feelings are less prevalent in non-intact family structures and among singles. ​+A larger fraction of individuals in intact marriages than always-single,​ divorced or separated, or divorced and remarried persons report “very, extremely” enjoying intercourse with their current sexual partner.((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “Degree to Which Respondent Enjoys Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner by Current Religious Attendance and Marital Status.” Available at [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-124.pdf]]. Accessed 19 December 2013.)) Likewise, a larger fraction of individuals in intact marriages than always-single,​ divorced or separated, or divorced and remarried persons report feeling satisfied,​((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “‘Feels Satisfied During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner’ by Current Religious Attendance and Marital Status,” Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-127.pdf]]. Accessed 19 December 2013.)) (See [[http://​downloads.frc.org/​EF/​EF13I38.pdf| Chart]] Below) loved,​((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “‘Feels Loved During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner’ by Current Religious Attendance and Marital Status,” Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-125.pdf]]. Accessed 19 December 2013.)) “taken care of,​”((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “‘Feels “Taken Care of” During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner’ by Current Religious Attendance and Marital Status,” Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-119.pdf]]. Accessed 19 December 2013.)) and thrilled or excited((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “‘Feels Thrilled, Excited During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner’ by Current Religious Attendance and Marital Status,” Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-116.pdf]]. Accessed 19 December 2013.)) during intercourse with their current sexual partner. Those in always-intact marriages were most likely to report feeling wanted and needed during intercourse (92 percent).((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, "​“Feels Wanted, Needed During Intercourse” with Current Sexual Partner by Marital Status and Religious Attendance,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-128.pdf]])) These feelings are less prevalent in non-intact family structures and among singles. ​
  
 [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-127.pdf|{{ :​feels_satisfied_during_intercourse_by_marital_status.jpg?​500 |Percentage Who Feel Satisfied During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner}}]] [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-127.pdf|{{ :​feels_satisfied_during_intercourse_by_marital_status.jpg?​500 |Percentage Who Feel Satisfied During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner}}]]
  
-Correspondingly,​ a smaller fraction of individuals in intact marriages than always-single,​ divorced or separated, or divorced and remarried persons report feeling [[http://​marri.us/​get.cfm?​i=MA12H04|guilty]],​((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “‘Feels Guilty During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner’ by Current Religious Attendance and Marital Status,” Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​get.cfm?​i=MA12H04]]. Accessed 19 December 2013.)) [[http://​marri.us/​get.cfm?​i=MA13E06|sad]],​((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “‘Feels Sad During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner’ by Current Religious Attendance and Marital Status,” Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​get.cfm?​i=MA13E06]]. Accessed 19 December 2013.)) or scared or afraid((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “‘Feels Scared, Afraid During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner’ by Current Religious Attendance and Marital Status,” Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​get.cfm?​i=MA12H05]]. Accessed 19 December 2013.)) (See [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF12K25.pdf| Chart]] Below) during intercourse with their current sexual partner. Those in always-intact marriages were the least likely to feel anxious or worried during intercourse with their current sexual partner (6.8 percent). Feeling anxious or worried during intercourse is more prevalent among those in non-intact structures and among singles: 12.1 percent of those who were divorced and remarried, 20.6 percent of those who were divorced or separated, 25.9 percent of those who were always single feel anxious or worried during intercourse with their current sexual partner. ((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, "'​Feels Anxious, Worried During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner,'​by Marital Status and Religious Attendance,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-118.pdf]]+Correspondingly,​ a smaller fraction of individuals in intact marriages than always-single,​ divorced or separated, or divorced and remarried persons report feeling [[http://​marri.us/​get.cfm?​i=MA12H04|guilty]],​((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “‘Feels Guilty During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner’ by Current Religious Attendance and Marital Status,” Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-117.pdf]]. Accessed 19 December 2013.)) [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-126.pdf|sad]],​((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “‘Feels Sad During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner’ by Current Religious Attendance and Marital Status,” Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-126.pdf]]. Accessed 19 December 2013.)) or scared or afraid((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, “‘Feels Scared, Afraid During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner’ by Current Religious Attendance and Marital Status,” Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-118.pdf]]. Accessed 19 December 2013.)) (See [[http://marri.us/​wp-content/uploads/MA-118.pdf| Chart]] Below) during intercourse with their current sexual partner. Those in always-intact marriages were the least likely to feel anxious or worried during intercourse with their current sexual partner (6.8 percent). Feeling anxious or worried during intercourse is more prevalent among those in non-intact structures and among singles: 12.1 percent of those who were divorced and remarried, 20.6 percent of those who were divorced or separated, 25.9 percent of those who were always single feel anxious or worried during intercourse with their current sexual partner. ((Patrick F. Fagan and Althea Nagai, "'​Feels Anxious, Worried During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner,'​by Marital Status and Religious Attendance,"​ Mapping America Project. Available at [[http://​marri.us/​wp-content/​uploads/​MA-118.pdf]]
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