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effects.of.marriage.on.children.s.education [2017/05/18 08:56]
marri [3.1 Related American Demographics]
effects.of.marriage.on.children.s.education [2017/05/18 09:43] (current)
marri
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 //(See [[effects_of_divorce_on_children_s_education|Effects of Divorce on Children'​s Education]] and [[effects_of_family_structure_on_children_s_education|Effects of Family Structure on Children'​s Education]])//​ //(See [[effects_of_divorce_on_children_s_education|Effects of Divorce on Children'​s Education]] and [[effects_of_family_structure_on_children_s_education|Effects of Family Structure on Children'​s Education]])//​
  
-Children raised in intact married families tend to earn higher grades than those in [[effects_of_family_structure_on_children_s_education|non-intact families]].((Patrick Fagan, Anne Dougherty, and Miriam McElvain, "164 Reasons to Marry,"​ Marriage and Religion Research Institute. Available at [[http://downloads.frc.org/EF/EF12A85.pdf]])) For example, kindergarten children from married families have higher reading scores than those from cohabiting families.((Julie Artis, “Maternal Cohabitation and Child Well-Being Among Kindergarten Children,​” //Journal of Marriage and the Family// 69, no. 1 (2007): 227-232.)) Parents in always-intact married families are also more likely to help their children do their homework than are parents in stepfamilies or single-parent families,​((Frank F. Furstenberg and Christine Winquist Nord, “Parenting Apart: Patterns of Child Rearing After Marital Disruption,​” //Journal of Marriage and the Family// 47, (1985): 893-904. As cited in Sandra J. Balli, David H. Demo, John F. Wedman, “Family Involvement with Children'​s Homework: An Intervention in the Middle Grades,” //Family Relations// 47, no. 2 (1998): 150.)) and fathers in always-intact married families are more involved in their children’s homework than are stepfathers.((Alan C. Acock and David H. Demo, //Family Diversity and Well-Being//​ (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 1994). As cited in Sandra J. Balli, David H. Demo, John F. Wedman, “Family Involvement with Children'​s Homework: An Intervention in the Middle Grades,” //Family Relations// 47, no. 2 (1998): 150.)) Compared with children in stable married families, students experiencing [[effects_of_divorce_on_children_s_education|parental divorce]] have lower academic expectations and test scores.((Youngmin Sun and Yuanzhang Li, “Children’s Well-Being During Parents’ Marital Disruption Process: A Pooled Time-Series Analysis,​” //Journal of Marriage and Family// 64, (2002): 472–488. As cited by The Heritage Foundation: Family Facts. Available at [[http://​www.familyfacts.org/​briefs/​35/​family-structure-and-childrens-education]]. Accessed 20 July 2011.))+Children raised in intact married families tend to earn higher grades than those in [[effects_of_family_structure_on_children_s_education|non-intact families]].((Patrick Fagan, Anne Dougherty, and Miriam McElvain, "164 Reasons to Marry,"​ Marriage and Religion Research Institute. Available at [[http://marri.us/research/​research-papers/​164-reasons-to-marry/]])) For example, kindergarten children from married families have higher reading scores than those from cohabiting families.((Julie Artis, “Maternal Cohabitation and Child Well-Being Among Kindergarten Children,​” //Journal of Marriage and the Family// 69, no. 1 (2007): 227-232.)) Parents in always-intact married families are also more likely to help their children do their homework than are parents in stepfamilies or single-parent families,​((Frank F. Furstenberg and Christine Winquist Nord, “Parenting Apart: Patterns of Child Rearing After Marital Disruption,​” //Journal of Marriage and the Family// 47, (1985): 893-904. As cited in Sandra J. Balli, David H. Demo, John F. Wedman, “Family Involvement with Children'​s Homework: An Intervention in the Middle Grades,” //Family Relations// 47, no. 2 (1998): 150.)) and fathers in always-intact married families are more involved in their children’s homework than are stepfathers.((Alan C. Acock and David H. Demo, //Family Diversity and Well-Being//​ (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 1994). As cited in Sandra J. Balli, David H. Demo, John F. Wedman, “Family Involvement with Children'​s Homework: An Intervention in the Middle Grades,” //Family Relations// 47, no. 2 (1998): 150.)) Compared with children in stable married families, students experiencing [[effects_of_divorce_on_children_s_education|parental divorce]] have lower academic expectations and test scores.((Youngmin Sun and Yuanzhang Li, “Children’s Well-Being During Parents’ Marital Disruption Process: A Pooled Time-Series Analysis,​” //Journal of Marriage and Family// 64, (2002): 472–488. As cited by The Heritage Foundation: Family Facts. Available at [[http://​www.familyfacts.org/​briefs/​35/​family-structure-and-childrens-education]]. Accessed 20 July 2011.))
  
 ====1.1 Related American Demographics==== ====1.1 Related American Demographics====